ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2004/12/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/01/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/02/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/03/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/04/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/05/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/06/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/07/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/08/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/09/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/10/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/11/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2005/12/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2006/01/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2006/02/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2006/03/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2006/04/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2006/09/ ARCHIVE: http://littletobacco.blogspot.com/2006/10/ AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/27/2005 09:04:00 AM TITLE: Pettigrew is Hanging with Hamas. A-List here I come! ----- BODY:
Canada as a soft power...or how to stay at least on the B-List in Paris (from the National Post):

Pettigrew refuses to condemn Hamas
OTTAWA - Foreign Affairs Minister Pierre Pettigrew says he wants to "wait and see" how the banned terrorist group Hamas fares in upcoming Palestinian elections before condemning their political participation in the key July vote.


One man's terrorist is another's Liberal supporter!
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/27/2005 08:30:00 AM TITLE: Chirac attempting a Martin ----- BODY:
Apparently the socialist way is to disregard democracy when it is inconvenient. Here we have the President of France, M Chirac, attempting a Paul Martin:

PRESIDENT CHIRAC of France is preparing to throw Europe into confusion and put Britain on the spot by backing moves to keep the European constitution alive if it is rejected in Sunday'’s referendum.

French diplomats say that M Chirac is expected to urge other countries to proceed with ratification because France does not want to be seen to be blocking the European project. Any attempt to persuade other countries to go ahead will dash the hopes of those in the British Government who believed that a French rejection would make a British referendum unnecessary.



British ministers argue that it will be impossible to hold a referendum next year because the final shape of the treaty on which the British would be voting will be unknown.

President Chirac was still insisting last night that renegotiation was out of the question if the French vote "no". British ministers believe that the only way that the French could get eventual approval would be to amend the constitution in a way that would make it unacceptable in Britain.

We do not know if there is going to be a yes’ or ‘no’ but a ‘no’ would create massive uncertainty about what we are supposed to be voting on,” a ministerial source said. M Chirac went on French television last night to deliver a dramatic last-ditch appeal for a ‘yes’ vote. He urged the French people not to punish his Government.

The decision before us goes far beyond traditional political divisions, he said. The choice was “about your future and that of your children, of the future of France and the future of Europe. On Sunday, everyone will have a share of the destiny of France in its hands.

He argued that the constitution would strengthen France's influence in Europe and reinforce the French social model. Rejecting it would create “divisions and doubts in Europe when we need a political Europe capable of bringing about a genuine European power”.

But the latest poll showed the rejectionists'’ support growing to 55 per cent -— the 13th poll in succession to put the no’ camp ahead. With two days of campaigning left, the French political establishment was left hoping for a Liverpool-style comeback.

Even as M Chirac prepared to deliver his appeal last night the recriminations within his centre-right UMP party had begun, and he was said by colleagues to have accepted that he had bungled by calling a referendum.

A "no" vote would leave M Chirac seriously weakened. His rival Nicolas Sarkozy, the UMP leader who aspires to become president in 2007, was blaming the Chirac Government's policies for fuelling the voter rebellion. M Chirac is expected to react to a French "non" by promising to listen to the people before making a second attempt at ratification.

He and other "yes" campaigners have said repeatedly during the campaign that there is no “Plan B” if the treaty is rejected and that there would not be a second referendum.

But one option being discussed in senior diplomatic circles is for candidates in the French presidential election in 2007 to promise to ratify the treaty in parliament rather than by referendum.

Mr Blair is expected to respond to the French result on Monday morning from Italy, where he is spending the Bank Holiday weekend. He is reconciled to Britain's six-month presidency of the EU, which starts in July, being dominated by efforts to salvage key parts of the constitution if the French and Dutch reject it.



(UPDATE: Damination beat me to the punch on this one)
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/25/2005 10:43:00 AM TITLE: Election Shocker! Tories only 2000 votes shy! ----- BODY:
Labrador went to the Liberals and they went for cheap. No demand that the base stay open. No getting the road paved. The outcome was never in doubt. Todd Russell is the new MP and he will have the job for as long as he wants, whether or not he ever sets foot in the House of Commons. Pending resignation, crossing the floor or death he is permanently employed.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/24/2005 11:18:00 AM TITLE: Been on the road ----- BODY:
I've been on the road so posting was light during the last week, including last Thursday's non-confidence vote. I will attempt to make up for it with this:
Lion Mutilates 42 Midgets in Cambodian Ring-Fight
In a related story, over at Instapundit, they are calling Zimbabwe the Cambodia of Africa ....
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/17/2005 01:07:00 PM TITLE: 51 Ways To Leave Your Lover ----- BODY:
What a morning to be traveling. Belinda Stronach throws a curve that no one saw coming. Crossing the House two days before a confidence vote? ... in the words of a Newfoundland CBC reporter: "There are now 51 ways to leave your lover." Where is the spine of these Conservatives? The word on the street is that Norm Doyle will be next to cross the House... I wonder what John Crosbie will have to say if that comes true.

UPDATE: Norm Doyle is sticking around. He actually asked a question in the House, not an everyday occurrence. Sorry Norm.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/16/2005 12:05:00 PM TITLE: Making it up as you go ----- BODY:
This simply is an excuse:

HALIFAX (CP) — The Liberals tied offshore deals with Newfoundland and Nova Scotia to the budget because it was the fastest way of getting them through Parliament, Prime Minister Paul Martin said Monday.

Martin said the move was made to avoid a filibuster by the Bloc Quebecois, which opposes the deals.

In an interview with CBC Radio, he said he can’t understand why the Conservatives have lined up with the Bloc in opposition to the budget when they hold such different positions on the Atlantic accords.

During a trip to Newfoundland last Friday, Martin turned up the heat on the province’s two Conservative MPs.

He urged Loyola Hearn and Norm Doyle to “do the right thing“ and save the accords by voting for the budget.


The Liberals tied the Atlantic Accord to the budget for their own political benefit - if the government was defeated n their budget they could say that the Tories voted against the deal. This BQ angle is new.... last week it was tied to the budget because it was a financial matter. The PM will say anything.

Now we have the Fair Deal For NF coming back to call on Doyle & Hearn to put province ahead of election fraud. Hardly fair. Hearn has been up in the House of Commons everyday asking the Liberals to sever the deal. The Tories moved a motion to sever the deal. At the end of the day it was the Liberals who made the passing of the deal political.

The populist approach says that the Tory MPs should vote for the budget. The principled approach says that the Tory MPs cannot vote confidence in a corrupt regime and that they will deliver the Accord if/when they are in power. I for one hope that principle prevails.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/15/2005 02:51:00 PM TITLE: newsweek publishes Elders of Zion ----- BODY:
Someone throws the Koran in the can and the riots start ...actually no one threw the Koran in the can ...it's just the guys who made it this crap up do not realize the ramifications from the fabrication. They have no idea about the dark ages.

And what's with the made up spelling?
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/15/2005 02:51:00 PM TITLE: ----- BODY:
Someone throws the Koran in the can and the riots start ...actually no one threw the Koran in the can ...it's just the guys who made it this crap up do not realize the ramifications from the fabrication. They have no idea about the dark ages.

And what's with the made up spelling?
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/13/2005 02:23:00 PM TITLE: Broadbent to Pair with Stinson ----- BODY:
CBC Reports:
Conservative Leader Stephen Harper has agreed to an offer made by NDP member of Parliament Ed Broadbent, who said he would sit out the budget vote on May 19 to negate the absence of one of Harper's MPs who has cancer.
As I commented over at Damian Penny, is it just me or does anyone else get the impression that Broadbent is not that thrilled with Layton's deal and would love to not tie his name to the confidence vote.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/13/2005 02:10:00 PM TITLE: Gagliano wants to testify again ----- BODY:
CTV reports that Gagliano wants another crack at testifying at the Gomery Inquiry.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/13/2005 01:01:00 PM TITLE: election fraud question ----- BODY:
Why is election fraud the missing story? Every admission at Gomery points to a deliberate plan to circumvent election laws. It seems that election fraud only matters when your side loses.

Maybe there is too much noise. I think back to the APEC incident with the pepper spray. The Best thing that happened for Jean Chretien was the RCMP letting loose at a bunch of kids with pepper spray. It outraged Canadians and distracted them from the real story - The Prime Minister had given direction to the RCMP for political reasons, not only violating such rights as association and speech, but actually ordering the arrest of individuals prior to the actual protests.

What is the pepper spray of the sponsorship scandal? Why is the traction so limited?
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/13/2005 09:57:00 AM TITLE: Liberals refuse to seperate Atlantic Accord ----- BODY:
The Tories moved it and the Libs defeated it. Paging Danny Williams!

UPDATE: Question Period and the question from the Liberal Backbench quotes Danny Williams - a vote against the budget is a vote against Newfoundland.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/13/2005 08:21:00 AM TITLE: Save me in your time of crisis! ----- BODY:
In January 1999 Brian Tobin, less than three years into a majority mandate, called a general election. It was, as Tobin pointed out, the norm to hold an election in Newfoundland every four years. And once he finished that third year, it would be the fourth year so what the heck.

In reality, Mr. Tobin was running to be leader of the Federal Liberal Party and he needed a big win in Newfoundland to show his popularity and to eliminate opposition scrutiny of the Liberal use of the treasury. Further, if Chretien made it known that he would resign and the leadership bagan in earnest, Tobin would need two terms & five years of service in the Newfoundland legislature to collect a full pension.

When the election started, the polls predicted that Tobin's Liberals would win all but two seats. The election did not go as planned and by the mid-point, the Liberals had scrapped their campaign plan and moved on. One of the problems that plagued Tobin was that he had made a commitment not to announce any new spending during the election. At the mid-point he went back on this commitment. He announced millions of dollars to be spent on tobacco reduction. When asked about his no-spending commitment Tobin replied "Who can blame me for wanting to keep tobacco out of the hands of kids?"

Now we see a Tory government under political pressure over the reorganization of the crab fishery. So what do they do? They head back to the well and make an over the top smoking ban announcement. Newfoundland, the claim will go, is leading the country! As for the bar owners and employees - who can blame the government for wanting to ensure that no worker in Newfoundland need ever smell a cigarette? Thank goodness the government is there to protect us in times of their political crisis.

(Full disclosure: Back in the day I worked on a project that was funded by the Canadian Tobacco Manufacturers Council. I have not so worked in some time)
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/12/2005 10:07:00 PM TITLE: Newfoundland No Smoking, No Investing ----- BODY:
What do these two stories have in common?

"FPI Suspends First-Quarter Dividend"
"Smoking Ban Legislation Unveiled"

They both represent the value that the Newfoundland Government puts on private investment.
A smoking ban is pretty well inevitable, but the disdain in which the government has treated people's investment in the name of the public good is evidenced by the extension of the ban Patios. Why? Public Health or some other excuse. Why doesn't the Government pop down and ask the boys at Green Sleeves how much they have invested in their deck? Becuase they could care less about private investment. The only good action is government action.

In Newfoundland you are not allowed to drive and use a cell phone, the only place in Canada. In Newfoundland the water standards are so high that you cannot drink water that everyone else in Canada could drink ( in response to the fact that the Tobin government refused to release a report on water standards.) Now they have joined California in banning smoking outside. Congrats. It sure looks like you care about the worker who should soon find a new job.

FPI is another victim. The Newfoundland Government, supported by then opposition leader Danny Williams, destroyed the investment of FPI shareholders for pure political reasons. Using comments by a FPI suitor as an excuse, they stripped the company of the ability to raise non-debt capital. As well, the company can never merge with or purchase another major company. As for the shareholders? Screw them. They do not vote. To make sure they do not sue we will put a privative clause in the legislation. Can't have that independent judiciary interfering in private property rights.

Of course the biggest theft was the Inco theft but there is no story on that one today.

One would think that the Newfoundland Government had some governing to do rather than some useless regulating? But it would seem that the reason that the Newfoundland economy is so strong is because they have been doing everything right for so long.

When the government is in control the first decision will always be political. In Newfoundland, the government regulates everything. No resources are used for the creation of wealth, just the creation of political capital. History repeating itself until everyone under the age of 40, who does not have a government job, is living on the mainland sending money home through their taxes to pay for that government job.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/12/2005 11:13:00 AM TITLE: NFLD Premier Supports Election Fraud ----- BODY:
Danny Williams thinks that Newfoundland MPs who vote against the budget are actually voting against the Atalntic Accord and should be punished:
Newfoundland Premier Danny Williams wants all of the province's MPs to vote for the federal budget.

That will put pressure on the province's two Conservative MPs, Loyola Hearn and Norm Doyle, chairman of the Tory caucus. The rest of the province's four MPs are Liberals and the riding of Labrador has been vacant since the death of Liberal MP Lawrence O'Brien in December.

The premier says that voting against the federal budget will be a conscious decision to vote against the revamped Atlantic Accord, signed last February, which is expected to bring an additional $2.6 billion to provincial coffers over the next eight years.


What he really means is that his government is under massive pressure over the crab fishery and he needs to create a distraction. Or at least he must mean this because it seems unlikely that the Premier would be supporting election fraud. He had ample opportunity to take down the flags until Paul Martin seperated the Atlantic Accord provisions from the budget bill.

hear my podcast at BlogMatrix
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/12/2005 08:23:00 AM TITLE: SES Research Poll - Best Line By a Pollster- Nik Nanos ----- BODY:
Best line by a pollster comes from Nikita Nanos, President of SES Research:
"On the one hand, the Liberal brand is under siege across Canada and especially in Quebec. On the other hand, the appetite for an election is weak. Predictions from this pollster - none."
You can watch Nik on CPAC tonight.

Here is Mr. Nanos' summary of the poll:

"With the national polls turbulent and an election imminent this
could truly become Canada's summer of discontent," according to
Nikita Nanos, President of SES. "On the one hand, the Liberal brand
is under siege across Canada and especially in Quebec. On the other
hand, the appetite for an election is weak. Predictions from this
pollster - none."

A new CPAC-SES survey indicated that two in three Canadians (67%)
believed that Prime Minister Paul Martin was aware that sponsorship
money was allegedly directed to advertising agencies and firms
closely linked to the federal Liberals. However, only a third (34%)
believed that he was personally involved in the alleged behaviour
discussed at the Gomery Inquiry, while 48% believed he was not
personally involved.

A majority of Canadians surveyed (58%) believed that the recent
allegations of money being directed to federal Liberals was about a
few "bad apples" in the Liberal Party of Canada, while three in ten
Canadians (30%) believed the problem extends to the whole Liberal
Party of Canada. Research indicated that Quebec voters were more
likely to believe that the problem extended to the whole federal
Liberal party (Quebec 42% whole party, Canada 30% whole party).

Despite all the attention paid to the Conservative Party and Bloc
Quebecois' determination to call an election, two thirds of Canadians
(67%) did not want an election until Justice Gomery had made his
final report. Only 19% of Canadians wanted an election now.

The detailed results with the regional breakdown is available on the
SES website (www.sesresearch.com).

Polling April 30th to May 4th, 2005 (Random telephone surveys of
1,000 eligible Canadian voters, 18 years of age or older, MoE ± 3.1%,
19 times out of 20). Percentages may not add up to 100 due to
rounding.

Question - When Paul Martin was the Minister of Finance, do you think
that he was aware or unaware that government sponsorship money was
allegedly directed to advertising agencies and firms closely linked
to the federal Liberals and to Liberal Party organizers?
Aware - 67%
Unaware - 21%
Unsure - 12%

Question - Do you think that Prime Minister Paul Martin was
personally involved or not involved in any of the alleged behaviour
discussed in the Gomery Inquiry?
Personally involved - 34%
Not personally involved - 48%
Unsure - 18%

Question - Do you think the recent allegations of money being
directed to federal Liberals is about a few "bad apples" in the
Liberal Party of Canada or do you think this problem extends to the
whole Liberal Party of Canada?
A few "bad apples" - 58%
The whole Liberal Party of Canada - 30%
Neither - 5%
Unsure - 7%
"With the national polls turbulent and an election imminent this
could truly become Canada's summer of discontent," according to
Nikita Nanos, President of SES. "On the one hand, the Liberal brand
is under siege across Canada and especially in Quebec. On the other
hand, the appetite for an election is weak. Predictions from this
pollster - none."

A new CPAC-SES survey indicated that two in three Canadians (67%)
believed that Prime Minister Paul Martin was aware that sponsorship
money was allegedly directed to advertising agencies and firms
closely linked to the federal Liberals. However, only a third (34%)
believed that he was personally involved in the alleged behaviour
discussed at the Gomery Inquiry, while 48% believed he was not
personally involved.

A majority of Canadians surveyed (58%) believed that the recent
allegations of money being directed to federal Liberals was about a
few "bad apples" in the Liberal Party of Canada, while three in ten
Canadians (30%) believed the problem extends to the whole Liberal
Party of Canada. Research indicated that Quebec voters were more
likely to believe that the problem extended to the whole federal
Liberal party (Quebec 42% whole party, Canada 30% whole party).

Despite all the attention paid to the Conservative Party and Bloc
Quebecois' determination to call an election, two thirds of Canadians
(67%) did not want an election until Justice Gomery had made his
final report. Only 19% of Canadians wanted an election now.

The detailed results with the regional breakdown is available on the
SES website (www.sesresearch.com).

Polling April 30th to May 4th, 2005 (Random telephone surveys of
1,000 eligible Canadian voters, 18 years of age or older, MoE ± 3.1%,
19 times out of 20). Percentages may not add up to 100 due to
rounding.

Question - When Paul Martin was the Minister of Finance, do you think
that he was aware or unaware that government sponsorship money was
allegedly directed to advertising agencies and firms closely linked
to the federal Liberals and to Liberal Party organizers?
Aware - 67%
Unaware - 21%
Unsure - 12%

Question - Do you think that Prime Minister Paul Martin was
personally involved or not involved in any of the alleged behaviour
discussed in the Gomery Inquiry?
Personally involved - 34%
Not personally involved - 48%
Unsure - 18%

Question - Do you think the recent allegations of money being
directed to federal Liberals is about a few "bad apples" in the
Liberal Party of Canada or do you think this problem extends to the
whole Liberal Party of Canada?
A few "bad apples" - 58%
The whole Liberal Party of Canada - 30%
Neither - 5%
Unsure - 7%

Question - Thinking about the timing of the next federal election, do
you believe that the testimony heard at the Gomery Commission to date
warrants an election call, or do you believe that an election should
be held following Justice Gomery's final report?
Election now - 19%
Wait for final report - 67%
Neither - 6%
Unsure - 8%

For in-depth coverage of the poll with SES President Nik Nanos, watch
PrimeTime Politics with Peter Van Dusen on CPAC - Canada's Political
Channel, live tonight.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/11/2005 08:19:00 PM TITLE: Latest post & Podcast ----- BODY:
My latest posts and podcasts on the no-confidence motion and gomery can be found over at blogmatrix.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/11/2005 11:26:00 AM TITLE: May 19th - Federal Budget Vote ----- BODY:
The Federal Libs are puting their budget to a vote on May 19th.
PM sets budget vote for May 19

The government’s fate will be decided May 19.

Prime Minister Paul Martin says that’s when MPs will vote on the budget — a vote that could bring down the government.

Opposition parties have been demanding that Martin introduce a confidence motion in the Commons, to prove his fragile minority government has the constitutional authority to govern.

The opposition has hinted it might disrupt Parliament because it considers the government illegitimate.

Martin met his cabinet met in emergency session before holding a caucus meeting.

The Commons passed a motion late Tuesday demanding that the government resign, but the Liberals dismissed it as a dress rehearsal for a similar vote expected later this month.

At least we have the date. We still do not have the integrity. At the Gomery Inquiry, the admissions continue :

MONTREAL (CP) - Jean Chretien's hometown was the drop-off point for a briefcase packed with $60,000 in cash for eastern Quebec Liberal candidates in the 1997 federal election, the sponsorship inquiry was told Tuesday.

Former party organizer Marc-Yvan Cote told the inquiry he brought the briefcase of $100 bills to Shawinigan, where the cash was handed out to at least nine candidates who had gathered to kick off the 1997 campaign.

He said the cash was one-half of a $120,000 sum he received for the 1997 campaign from Michel Beliveau, then head of the party's Quebec wing.

"If memory serves, I think it was at the launch of the campaign, in 1997, in Shawinigan," said Cote, then chief organizer for eastern Quebec.

Presiding judge John Gomery pressed him to clarify where the money was distributed.

"You received the money from Mr. Beliveau in Montreal?" asked the judge.

Cote repied: "In Montreal."

The judge added: "That you brought to Shawinigan."


And in the PMO, the spending of the future carries on:
...with more than $20 billion in recent spending pledges coming only a few months after a generous federal budget, Martin has handcuffed future leaders with extensive and expensive plans, the experts say.

He's also blown any chance to develop new ways to boost Canada's sluggish productivity, they add.

"There's not a lot of room to do other things . . . such as tax cuts or any kind of productivity initiatives," says Rick Egelton, chief economist with Bank of Montreal.

"It's an opportunity lost."
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/11/2005 11:13:00 AM TITLE: By the way - there is a budget today ----- BODY:
Lost in the no-confidence, adscam shuffle, the Ontario Government is budget being brought down today. If it is a good budget, then the fact that it is lost will be good for John Tory. If it a budget that breaks a few promises, then the it may be good for Stephen Harper as vote-rich Ontarians may just get fed up with the Liberals in general.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/11/2005 09:22:00 AM TITLE: No Confidence ----- BODY:
No confidence? You betcha ... Take a look at the motion voted on last night and you will see that every yea was a call for the resignation of the government. (UPDATE: Andrew Coyne has more on this. In fact he has a "legal opinion" or some such thing.)

At the end of the day what we saw yesterday was the bubble effect on the parties and on the press. The national press are loving the goings-on in Ottawa. There is big news every day, sometimes every minute. They are constantly being spun and all-in-all I bet its a great time. However, being in the bubble gives a certain perspective that does not jive with the real world. The best political operators I know are those that manage to keep a foot in the real world during a campaign or crisis. In the bubble the big picture passes you by.

The big picture here is:

  1. We are governed by a corrupt political party that has been peddling influence, intimidating business, pilfering public cash and committing habitual election fraud.
  2. We are governed by a party that has rendered Parliament a powerless, irrelevant institution by stripping away opposition days and removing budgetary matters from the works. The Liberals are refusing to recognize that the House of Commons has lost confidence in the Government.
  3. We are governed by a party so addicted to the public purse for running elections that they are now doing with the treasury that which they used to do with the Sponsorship money.

The big thing is that the Liberals do not see anything wrong with this. They are no longer a political party, they are a corporation in the business of government; and they see that company as their own rather than their shareholders. Bonuses for the directors and profit sharing instead of dividends. And if anyone tries to take over the board, there is a poison pill waiting.



The press, well they have to take a look at the big picture and declare this whole getting defeated on the budget nonsense for what it is - the aforementioned nonsense and a political fiction. Simply announcing spending and programs so that you can say that the Tories voted against them (when in fact they were voting against the government) is not governing, it is campaigning and it should be so called.

As for the Tories, They have to stop ratifying the Liberal spending. They need to call the government corrupt, seek to protect the integrity of Parliament and then set out their agenda for all to see.


Here is my podcast at BlogMatrix
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/10/2005 02:37:00 PM TITLE: Election Fraud II ----- BODY:

Is there not an Officer of Parliament who looks into election fraud? Where the hell is said officer? There are no longer allegations of election fraud coming out of Gomery, there are admissions. Election fraud is the stuff of tyrannies and banana republics.

Waiting for Gomery is one thing. Some indication that the officials at Elections Canada are doing their job would be another, quite reassuring thing.

As always, Coyne is all over Gomery. Better still, he is after Gagliano who, in true gangster form, hit the phone in an effort to intimidate a witness. Still, if we are to believe the Liberals, or at least the Liberals in the House of Commons, none of the allegations are true, even if they can not bring forward any evidence to counter the claims. It is just a steady string of denials.

(Link to Election Fraud I podcast)

-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/10/2005 10:29:00 AM TITLE: The Tories need to clean up their message ----- BODY:
Tory message:
  1. The Tories must bring down the government. It is an obligation; a duty.
  2. The Liberal Government is corrupt to its core and are now doing with the taxpayers money that they were used to doing with the sponsorship money ... creating an unfair election conditions.
  3. The Liberals carry on about procedure because they simply have lost the confidence of the House of Commons. The Liberals cannot win a Confidence vote.
  4. The Liberals can, like a communist dictator, announce spending plans to the year 2035 . The Tories will not observe spending commitments which are not in line with our agenda or are otherwise sound public policy.
  5. The Tory agenda is: A return to a policy driven agenda.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/06/2005 08:02:00 AM TITLE: National Unity ----- BODY:
Richard Gwynne kind of beat me to the punch. I was writing about how nationalism is the scourge of Canada, how it disallows any dissent. Then I pick up The Star (to see how they are propping up the Liberals today) and I came across this by Gwynn:

The fault is in part ours. We've assumed national unity had to be treated like a great big national sacred cow. For some time now it has been doing to us what cows usually do. We were too distracted, or paying too little attention, or were too scared to protest.

It's time to end the charade so that our politics can return to more or less normal. (Let's not kid ourselves, there always will be some corruption; power itself does corrupt.)

We need to stop bowing and scraping before the sacred cow of national unity. We need to talk about other things and let national unity work itself out, largely by itself.

And just maybe it already has, if my analysis, which I've set out here before, is correct — namely that Quebecers have already separated, but within Canada. There's therefore no need for them now to risk the uncertainties and costs of actually separating. Anyway, the time is long overdue for us to talk about something else.


I will write or podacast about nationalism, but for now I think that Gwyn has hit on the symptom of the bigger problem, in this country we do not debate for fear of self-examination. We are what we pretend to be so no one should mention that the emperor has no clothes. We all know that he doesn't. He knows that he doesn't. But they sure look good in the mind's eye.
-------- AUTHOR: Little Tobacco DATE: 5/03/2005 09:33:00 AM TITLE: Good for Harper ----- BODY:
The Tories will attempt to force the election:

Stephen Harper left no doubt last night that the Conservatives will try to defeat the government as soon as they can, even if it means a summer election.

"There is a unanimous view that the Conservative Party cannot support the government," the Tory Leader said after emerging from a special session of his caucus, which returned from a week off with what he said was overwhelming support for a national election.

The Liberal government "should face the House of Commons in a [confidence] vote at the earliest possible opportunity," Mr. Harper said. "To do otherwise would be in all likelihood to unnecessarily delay an election into the summer but we have a responsibility and we cannot support the government."

He said the government apparently plans to wait a month to have a vote. "In a way, it's out of our hands. We're going to try and force the issue. The government's the one that is playing for time."


Good for Harper. A responsible opposition cannot leave the Liberals in power. The polls are in flux, but when the government is using the taxpayers monsey to run a campaign a principled opposition has little choice. The Martin government is announcing motherhood programs that they can accuse the Tories of voting against when the Tories vote non-confidence. It is time to put this disfunctional parliament to bed and start over.
--------